Designer Isabel Felmer

Collaborating with mannequin brand Hans Boodt, Isabel Felmer’s S/S ’18 collection is about giving the people a show.

The French Chilean, born in Berlin, combined the intricacies of design with her own photos as prints, inspired by the ’80s model Sayoko.

A futuristic, yet retro, feel, the fun colors and silhouettes is both modern and dramatic, a nod to Felmer’s experience as a costume designer.

Felmer presented her S/S ’18 collection as performance art to Paris Fashion Week stylistas, with four socialites in the spotlight.

Take a look at photos from her show below.

Photos: Karina Perepadya

For Vladimiro Gioia, inspiration comes from the Land of the Rising Sun—Japan. Exploring the duality of sensitivity and strength within the female samurai, Gioia’s collection aims to balance the wise and noble with grace and harmony.

Feminine blouses and dresses show off this duality: they mix texture and patterns, sheen with sheer, black with color. Topped off with hand-stitched details around the torso to form the outline of a samurai’s armor, the juxtaposition of concepts sit side by side in each piece.

There is something so alluring, yet so badass about this collection.

The prints themselves are reminiscent of the Azuchi-Momoyama period, a time when Japanese unification was still underway, and utilize the symbols of beauty and war, the sakura and the samurai. In a nod to the traditional pagoda screens, Gioia also includes peacock and heron prints.

A vision of a fighter, Vladimiro Gioia’s woman is one of strength, courage, and unwavering values. But for the S/S 2018 collection, we peek into her inner woman.

Check out our favorites below.

Photos: Vladimiro Gioia

Fashion for Conservation took to the runway to raise awareness and funds for African elephants. Presenting their Elephantasia campaign at London Fashion Week, Fashion For Conservation worked with 24 international designers to create unique, conscientious pieces.

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The elephant—A majestic, elegant creature.

Gliding down the runway in whites, khaki greens, and gray and silver hues, the multitude of looks formed a cohesive collection despite the number of designers. From sophisticated elephant shapes and patterns to voluminous pieces to intricate details, the creativity and heart put into this cause is unmatched.

In the spirit of preserving one of nature’s treasures, the collection brought together minds from all over the world, including: Kromagnon, Gabriela Rose, Amin Phillips, Autonomous Collection, Tatiana Shebelnik, Annafora, Re.ne(w), Free Mind, Gypset Girl, Dawnamatrix, J. Von Stratton, Meredith Allen, AS Fashion Ibiza, C.Nicol, Ashanti Renee, and more.

Elephantasia had everyone in a trance with its absolute breathtaking collection, reminding fashion week-goers that only we can protect the elephant.

Proceeds from Elephantasia’s S/S ’18 collection benefit the African Wildlife Foundation and Elephant Crisis Fund.

Watch the slideshow to see these drop-dead amazing pieces for yourself.

Photos: Fashion For Conservation

Fashion for Conservation was founded by three women determined to make a positive impact on the world through conservation-inspired couture. Nazanine Afshar (Art Director, British Vogue), Dr. Samantha Zwicker (wildlife conservationist), and Ava Holmes (wilderness survivor and fashion week producer), combined their talents and passions to create fashion campaigns that educate consumers on animals and ecosystems, while donating 100% of funds raised to wildlife groups.

www.fashionforconservation.com

Flying to New York for Fashion Week was a dream come true for six Indonesian designers showing for the first time on the Indonesian Diversity SS18 Runway. New York Fashion Week: First Stage is a new platform that gives global designers the opportunity to show at NYFW, whether they are debuting in the U.S. for the first time or looking to make new global connections and further their presence.

Beautiful handcrafted fabrics and embroideries glided down the runway unlike anything industry members had ever seen before, though the details and level of craftsmanship are customary of high-end Indonesian fashion. Guests were wowed as theatrical beats pumped through the room and models walked impeccably adorned by handcrafted Indonesian elements.

Each designer saw this show as an opportunity to bring Indonesian design to the runways of New York to embody cultural inclusion in a tough social climate. 

Scroll down to learn more:

 

DIAN PELANGI

Geometric prints and beaded brocades permeated Dian Pelangi’s bold collection. Menswear-inspired suiting pieces in unexpected bright colors brought to life the hustle and bustle of New York City. Subway tile-like embellishments highlighted waistlines and shoulders and gave creative flair to straight silhouettes. 

BARLI ASMARA

Barli Asmara showed a gorgeous collection of white lace cold shoulder dresses and gowns. Inspired by purity and Middle Eastern architecture, these layered and laced up pieces were complimented by bejeweled statement earrings. A full pearl embellished gown stole the show with its powerful turtleneck structure and beaded waistline. 

MELIA WIJAYA

Melia Wijaya dug all the way to her roots to create a collection of impressive garments tied to the famous Indonesian folklore, Sawunggaling. The story praises the creative and full of energy rooster and peacock. In an effort to preserve the true meaning, Wijaya sent feather adorned headpieces, gowns and separates down the catwalk in earthy tones. Caged boning created an hourglass frame on a gorgeous few gowns and pants. 

CATHERINE NJOO

Larger than life, yet dainty gold headpieces sat atop Catherine Njoo’s models. Rich, gold embroideries and beaded batik fabrics crafted into beautiful forms created an ultra luxurious wave over the entire collection. Rounding out Njoo’s runway was a jaw-dropping, egg-shaped gold headpiece that opened and closed to unveil a dimly lit pagoda. 

VIVI ZUBEDI

Vivi Zubedi believes in a world of equal love between all cultures and crafted an incredible collection to hone in on that theme. A rich color palette with subtle prints was embellished with branded patchwork that read “Makkah Madinah Jannah”. Also, making a bold political statement was her floor length abbaya embellished with a beautiful “All Colors Matter” and her use of various size models dressed in hijab, including plus size. 

DORIS DORTHEA

All designers accessorized with handbags by the infamous Doris Dorthea, top celebrity go-to designer for custom handbags. The brand prides itself on the use of exotic skins and leather. Vibrant colors collided with exotic skin in beautifully crafted, structured mini bags. 

 

 

For more information visit http://indonesiafashiongallery.com/en/ or follow at @ifg_nyc.

Photos: Brian Ach for Indonesian Diversity NYFW: First Stage

Scar-id defines itself through its ambiguity. Black, minimal, genderless, neutral, leather. Building blocks of concepts, where words can be added, removed, reordered, and redefined.

Created in 2011 by Sílvia Pinto Costa and Andre Ramos, scar-id first appeared as a brand through  a line of leather accessories. The studio, which is also an architectural office and photography studio, is located in Porto’s Art neighborhood, curating limited and exclusive pieces designed in Portugal.

Costa and Ramos decided to design once again, recognizing the need of a conceptual separation, and so created the sub-brand ATER by scar-id in the process. The original scar-id brand is a reference to selling and promoting Portuguese design. Unable to withstand the test of time, ater was the Latin word for dull black, ultimately vanishing from the language.

No gender, no time. ATER by scar-id has now expanded its accessory line to include handbags. Each one is produced manually in a small factory in the suburbs of Porto. Resurrecting ambiguity, anonymity, and timelessness, ATER by scar-id is the perfect item to stay with you through the cold winter ahead.

Scroll down to check out their work:

Photos: scar-id

No stranger to the fashion scene, Lithuania-born Agne Kuzmickaite isn’t afraid of a little color.

Her inspiration frequently comes from the everyday, commenting on themes overlooked. This time, attracted to the brilliance of the outdoors, Kuzmickaite brought nature to the runway.

Past experience in costume design allows Kuzmickaite to toe the line of wearability. Though the pieces put flirty and feminine pleated skirts and cinched waists to work, they also take bold color to another level with rainbow stripes.

Meanwhile, Kuzmickaite’s collection comes to life with floral photos, instead of prints. Complete with a touch of 3-D appliqués and eco-friendly, natural fabrics, her visuals and thoughts on nature were conveyed loud and clear.

We hope to see Kuzmickaite venturing out beyond Eastern Europe in fashion weeks to come.

 

Photos: GPS Radar

Fashionable, yet wearable—Three words that sum up Alena Tumko. The budding Ukrainian designer presented her collection to the largest fashion week in Eastern Europe, Mercedes Benz Fashion Week (MBFW) Kiev… But she wasn’t quite happy with the results.

The collection had a casual, carefree vibe that screamed ‘effortlessly chic’, outlining loose-fitting pieces with simple lines. Importing the fabrics from Italy and Paris, Tumko drew attention to the waist with wrap jackets and cut-out details, juxtaposing it with bondage-inspired collars and print. And the models’ fresh faces with clean eyeliner gave the pieces an overall confident stance.

Yet on her Facebook page, Tumko publicly complained about MBFW organizers, stating that the only thing she received from MBFW was photos. All promotions focused on a select few designers, and Tumko was less than impressed with MBFW’s lack of support.

With drama brewing in the Eastern European fashion world, we are left wondering if Alena Tumko is ready to take on the world.

 

Photos:  GPS Radar